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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 58 (some duplicates have been removed)
with lawmakers as lyndon johnson did. >> yeah, far guy who is so smart it really does puzzle me. perhaps jod city or john can answer as to why he just doesn't appreciate the fact that personal relationships matter in politics at every level always have going back to lincoln. look at spielberg's film. 2013 always will. he doesn't do it terribly well, maybe that's why he wants to suggest it doesn't matter. i agree with everything that jodi just said about some of the opportunities. i do think it's worrisome and not just a parochial matter. it's worrisome that they aren't bringing more people in not just because diversity of voices and views helps but some of these people are tired. some of these people-- particularly economic people-- they are spent, charlie. i wish there were -- you had this sense there was an infusion of fresh ideas and fresh blood. not to change views and change him but just to kind of bring more vital toy the tail rather than just get ready for the big fight. senator chuck schumer has a theory to go to al's point that he tells his colleagues which is that because president obam
with democratic leaders, lyndon johnson. i talked with the brookings scholar who was a young aide in the eisenhower white house. he said eisenhower was deeply not do anything. an and lbj but he knew to make things work you had to have this getting along. the key difference here is johnson, rayburn, o'neal, they could deliver. this president does not have someone who can deliver and in the senate, republicans have abused the fill bupser. -- filibuster. >> describe eisenhower? >> he was devious. >> he was the most devious person nixon had ever known. you said, i mean that in a positive sense. >> they could work together. >> reagan was not actually dealing with a house my majority, -- minority, that there was a conservative majority in the house. when you add the republicans and conservative democrats. what we had was ideological sorting since then of the the parties were nor geographical. nowadays if you're conservative, you're republican. if you're a liberal, you're a democrat. obama is up against an actual majority of conservative house members. reagan didn't have to face a majori
instead of wanting to be magic johnson, he wants -- >> now the moan is beginning mark. charles schumer of new york, the chairman of the joint committee on inaugural ceremony. >> mr. president, mr. vice president. members of congress, all who are present, and to all who are watching, welcome to the capital and to his celebration of our great democracy. [applause] [cheering] >> this is the 57th inauguration of an american president. and no matter how many times one witnesses this event, it's simplicity, its innate majesty, and most of all, it's meaning, that sacred yet cautious entrusting of power from we the people to our chosen leader, never fails to make one's heart beat faster as it will today with the inauguration of president barack h. obama! [cheering] >> now, we know that we would not be here today where it not for those who stand guard around the world to preserve our freedom. to those in our armed forces, we offer our infinite thanks. for your bravery, your honor, your sacrifice. >> this democracy of ours was forged by intellect argument, by activism and blood. and, above all,
a previous president, lyndon b. johnson. joining us is joe who served as a special assistant to lbj and a close adviser to president kennedy as well. he is the author of the awesomely titled what the approximately hell is a presidency for? >> making washington work, a new publication and he joins us now. i am endlessly fascinated with lbj and the life story and the 39s presidency. you can read these books and see the immediate change when jfk dies and lbj assumes the office, there is this bill install and he works his magic and the phones and gets his way on that and gets his way on the tax bill that kennedy couldn't get through. my question is when you look at the great skills and the talents that lbj had dealing with the senate and congress, do they really apply in the era of hyper polarization that we live in? the republican leader. does mitch mcconnell respond with the same? >> i think you have to remember that there was terrific polarization in the 1960s. the democratic party was in control of tourn democrats who were against the kifl rights bills and controlled the mitties. th
-- johnson says to bush what are you doing here? bush he said, we just want to pay our respects. johnson was advising bush for the next couple of years about whether or not to run for office. johnson's the one who when bush was going to run for the senate he said what's the difference between the house and the senate? he said what's the difference between chicken and chicken salad? can you imagine now a republican congressman from houston going to see off a democratic president out of respect? >> especially mika the inauguration of a newly elected president in your party when everybody is most excited to elbow their way to the front. for george h.w. bush that's a great example. another great example, william f. buckley. he had liberal friends. in fact, he campaigned for liberals that were his friends even though he knew it upset some on the conservative side. for william f. buckley, it wasn't a blood sport. >> to end this block, to counter it just a bit, and i'm sorry but it has the added value of being true, the president does need to reach out.agree. but he has, an
1965 we saw that shift over to the republican party. they say that in 1965 when president johnson signed the voting rights act, he turned to bill morris' aide and said i believe we have lost the south to the republicans for a very long time. so case in point. we have seen that previously conservative element that was part of the democratic south go to the republican party. changing houses. and at the same time the other shift we're seeing is in the implicit nature of intolerance. so previously we saw explicit intolerance in terms of lynches and poll taxes. but today it's about lazy. it's about being shucking and jiving. and in regards to latinos, it's about being illegal. so we're seeing intolerance repackaged and in a new home. >> well, and i think johnson said we've lost it to the south i think it was 20 years he said we're at 28 now. since he said that. but jonathan, when you look at the fact that -- and you wrote about the general powell's warning. when you look back to 2008, the ugly rhetoric had started. listen to this and watch this. >> our opponent is someone who sees amer
's package. max baucus of montana, senator heidi heitkamp of north dakota, senator johnson of south dakota. senator donnelley of i7d ind. senator begich of alaska, senator manchin of west virginia, senator tester of montana. however, senator mark warner spoke out in favor of the president's plan and said he believes it has bipartisan support. those senators all have a or a-plus ratings from the national rifle association. reid has a b rating. these senators know they will lose their high rating and maybe become a target with the nra if they vote for a sensible assault weapons ban. you see, we had the assault weapons ban back in 1994, but we're so screwed up in washington right now they're even afraid to go back to that. every senator should explain to their constituency why they would not cast a vote for the assault weapons ban. what's the holdup? what are you afraid of? certainly it's not the nra. these senators should not fear the national rifle association. the nra didn't affect any races in the last election cycle and it probably won't do it the next time around. now, if senate democra
released a letter to vice president scott smith, our second vice president kevin johnson and i drafted, 131 of our mayors sign, calling on congress to adopt a bipartisan and balanced approach deficit reduction by incorporating spending cuts with additional revenue. we took the same message to both political conventions and to the presidential debate where mayors of both parties were active and visible participants, speaking for commonsense solutions to the pending fiscal crisis. in just one week after the election, our leadership came to washington. we met with the vice president biden in the white house, the entire house democratic leadership, senate majority caucus, and rising leaders such as senator marco rubio, and other key decision-makers, pushing for action to the fiscal cliff. during those meetings we made it known that cities have already led on deficit reduction. mayors know how to balance budgets. [applause] we do it every day. we do it every year. through this recession we made the tough decisions that washington has been unwilling to make. while we also maintained key investmen
johnson, was in power. this president has made no secret of his ambition to be the fourth transformative president. and the question is, will he, in his speech today, show a kind of combative nature that led to franklin roosevelt's overreaching and historic change of the politics of the country? >> you see the congressional leaders for the country. steny hoyer, and we just saw them go to the capitol. >> we saw janet napolitano, and security making their way in. you were talking about lincoln in the course of this presidency. i want to pick up the pictures of him because they are among the most startling. he lost 50 pounds. he was about 150 pounds weighing in, at 6'4". >> the picture on the right side, abraham lincoln, only 56 years old. look at those eyes. of course, the lincoln memorial there. martin luther king in the shadow, gave that speech 50 years ago. and there, we see, as you see more -- i think that's katy perry there. >> i believe it is. >> on the steps of the capitol. along with john mayer. we're going to come back. she performed at the kids' concert saturday night. we're goin
. and finally, when he supports social security, medicaid and medicare, that's straight lyndon johnson, great society talk. this is a speech in the progressive tradition. at some points it's like the second inaugural of franklin roosevelt where fdr in 1937 said be proud you're an individual but there's also a collective. and you guys mentioned the word people, how often he said, we, the people. but this is, we, the people almost in a howard zimm people of america kind of way. this was about ordinary people fighting for ordinary rights, stonewall has replaced normandy. you know, selma has replaced iwo jima. there wasn't a marshal tone, this was about inclusion. >> he used the term we, and he used the term common creed over and over again throughout the speech. norah o'donnell was listening to the speech down there on the national mall. nor norah? >> and, scott, on that theme the president used the word together some seven times. a word he used just once in 2009. and i think you're right, this was in some ways a civil rights speech. because the president said, our journey is not complete. that'
. there is how to light the building sites and the cranes that will be looked into. the mayor today boris johnson went to visit the crash site. he said it was, quote, deeply disturbing. >> it's a scene of -- a tragic scene of a -- the wreckage of a carbonized helicopter and, of course, great deal of damage done to an adjacent building. it doesn't take a great deal to imagine what could have happened had that helicopter crashed into a bus or a heavily occupied building. >> bill, 12 people were injured. a center was set up to deal with victims of shock because obviously the scenes were very dramatic. also, there were lots of very close calls. we heard eyewitnesses talking about how they ran from falling debris. got away within a whisper of getting hit. also, of course, we he did hear that that crane operator just happened to be late today. otherwise, he likely would have been caught up in all of this as well. >> bill: what a wild scene as it played out this morning in rain shower. amy kellogg live in london with us tonight. as our nation gets closer to maxing out on a credit card. some lawmakers ha
was rare. very, very rare. so in lyndon johnson's tenure as majority leader which ended when he was vice president in january of '61, there was one filibuster in his six years. and harry reid's six years, almost 400. that's the contrast. it's gradual. the right to filibuster has been there since the modern senate was there. but it's the perversion of senators that are willing to filibuster anything, any single thing they bring this to bear. >> describe that perversion. >> that perversion is everything from the almost 100 judicial vacancies that you talked about to many examples of recess appointments in the executive branch. we just spent $3 billion on a presidential election and the president's appointees, most of them he makes now are most likely never to get confirmed, unlikely to get debated, certainly unlikely to get discussed and certainly unlikely to serve. >> you want to end the filibuster. what's behind that? >> senator jeff morgan would make it essential that people talk. this is what the american people want. it would encourage debate, it wouldn't push it away. >> what is your
this after 380 filibusters compared to when lyndon johnson was the senate majority leader where he had one filibuster? >> well, this is the point, right? we have a senate that's frozen, broken, doesn't work. pick your favorite adjective or vertebrae. it's not working. this is not what democracy looks like. it's only on the first day and technically we're still in the first day of the congress, two-year period that this can be done by 51 senators, meaning in this case there's 55 in the democratic caucus and we'll take 51 of them. we need all of those 51 to stand up to have a senate that actually discusses the issues of the day. and allows the president's nominations to reach the floor and allows conference committees to actually meet. so when the house and senate pass two different bills there's a way to reconcile that. none of that is happening. >> harry reid said that he has been negotiating with senate minority leader mitch mcconnell to avoid having the so-called nuclear option. i would go so far as to say does mitch mcconnell even deserve to be in the position to negotiate what the sena
in this senate? the contrast is enormous from the time that lyndon b. johnson was president of the senate. lyndon b. johnson for six years presiding over this body saw one filibuster. and harry reid in his six years presiding over this senate has seen 391 filibusters. and let me convey that even when you have the votes to end a filibuster, the fact that it is launched creates enormous paralysis. imagine you're debating a bill and you continue debating through the end of the week and you come in the following monday and you debate and nobody has anything to say and so somebody says, "i ask unanimous consent that we have a final vote on this bill." now, you see, we don't have a previous question, motion on this floor, so one has to ask for unanimous consent. any of a hundred senators can weigh in and say "no." and when they they weigh in and say "no" on that monday, on tuesday, a petition is put forward with 16 senators saying, let's have a vote on closing debate. and that vote can't happen until thursday, under the rules. and if it's successful on a thursday, you have to have 30 hours more of deba
regulation -- until it happened. consider the civil rights act of 1964. it took johnson's legislative genius to overcome what seemed to be an unshakeable logjam. in our lifetimes we have served enough non-trivial change to impaire that the iron grip of these forces can be shattered and policy can progress. and the debate over the regulation of guns and the balance of civil obligation will command sustained attention from our political leadership, as lobbyists apply their cases. in this unruly mix, universities like ours will discharge a critical role in principled scaffolding for the debate. our scholars have investigated gun violence for the last two decades. we have produced national recognized research to curtail gun violence. we have accumulated a wealth of knowledge and we hope much of it will come to the floor the next few days. we have convened scholars and advocates and want to sue this opportunity to cut through the din of the shrill and incendiary by identifying specific recommendations that evidence- based analysis will work and can be rendered congruent with our legal institution
and fairly? vote for president johnson on november 3rd. the stakes are too high for you to stay home. >> congressman grimm, is there an anti-new york attitude in the republican party nationally, anti-new york? >> i don't think so. i mean, there's always been a little bias against new york. i think that goes way back. there's no question. i've seen it and felt it. but i think what we have right now is just, you know, the deep-rooted concern overall that the country is spending money that it doesn't have and the need to be fiscally responsible, which i wholeheartedly agree with and i respect, it's cluster when things like this happen, natural disasters -- >> i didn't hear this during katri katrina. when the southerners were voting their own pocket boost, when the southern republicans were helping themselves out in what was really a tragedy as well as this one and it was very vivid, maybe more vivid in terms of national coverage than new york, i got to tell you, i didn't hear anybody talking about offsets. i heard them saying let's get the money to people like hailey bauer bor. >> i und
-time ally, liberia's president ellen johnson surleaf. >> it's important to be here today to see that you have fully recovered from your recent illness. >>> on "today" chelsea clinton speaks for the first time about her mom's recovery. >> she is exuding the energy, the vibrancy, and certainly the mental acuty that she always has. i am so grateful that she is not only fine, but healthy and vibrant and strong and, you know, god willing, will be for the next 65 years of her life. >> and chelsea clinton is also chairing the national day of service on saturday. more on that to come. good day. i'm andrea mitchell live in washington. the political cavalry has arrived. new york senator chuck schumer has given his seal of approval to president obama's defense nominee. any decision that could rally senate democrats and signal an easier path to confirmation for former senator chuck hagel. joining us now washington post columnist greta -- white house correspondent kristen welker. welcome both. kristen, what is the white house, breathing a huge sigh of relief now that they've reeled chuck schumer in o
the civil rights act of 1964. it took lyndon johnson to probably send it forward. he overcame what seems to be an unshakable logjam. in short, in our lifetimes, we have served enough nontrivial policy changes to recognize the inherent iron grip of status quo forces can be shattered and policy can progress. in the next few weeks, we can anticipate and hope that the debate over the regulation of guns and the balance between individual rights and civic obligation will command sustained into serious attention from our political leadership. advocates will mobilize as lobbyists plied their cases. in this unruly mix, universities like ours can and will discharge a critical role in providing principled scaffolding for this debate. here at johns hopkins, our scholars have been investigating the public health effects of gun violence for well over two decades. for the past 17 years, the center for gun aussie and research, envisaged by our colleague, has provided a home for that study areas producing nationally recognized research and recommendations aimed at understanding and curtailing the impact
. trillions of dollars have been spent since president johnson declared war on poverty, and yet the gerald the poverty rate nationwide has remained virtually unchanged at more than 23%. we need a new strategy. we intuitively know that the brookings institute is reported. the best way to combat childhood poverty is three things. the key to the child success is the ability to read. this morning 45,000 kansas children woke up, one dressed and went to kindergarten. a class of two dozen 25 and their the future of kansas. being a will to read is one of the greatest gift that we can give these children, yet 29 percent of kansas' fourth graders didn't work -- can we get a basic level. the goal of the of restoration is to ensure each of the 40,000 kindergartners is able to read professionally by the time they reach the fourth grade. we can do this. we must do this. it is important to our kids. [applause] this is why i am proposing that chances as the initiative with three components, first providing $12 million support to innovative programs to help struggling readers. second, provide incentives to
] to nurses everywhere, thank you, from johnson & johnson. [ female announcer ] to nurses everywhere, see lioutdoors, or in.ight. transitions® lenses automatically filter just the right amount of light. so you see everything the way it's meant to be seen. maybe even a little better. visit your eyecare professional today to ask about our newest lenses, transitions vantage and transitions xtractive lenses. experience life well lit. ask which transitions adaptive lens is best for you. >>> you know you're not supposed to do it, but taking your eyes off the road, even for a moment, can have a devastate impact. >> and cnn's sandra endo is here. you actually climbed into a simulator to sort of illustrate all of this. >> yeah. and it was very surprising, joe and kate, just what could happen, if you take your eyes off the road, just for a few seconds. really, it just shows, also, how deadly cell phones could be or any type of distraction inside your car. and it happened to me in a simulator. but we also spoke with one woman who shared with us her tragedy real-life story. if this picture doesn't say
. not tonight." [ female announcer ] to nurses everywhere, thank you, from johnson & johnson. >>> standing at the president's side today over at the white house, four children each of whom wrote him letters like this one which reads -- and let me read it to you. i am writing you to ask you to stop gun violence. jessica yellin spoke to some of the children after the white house event. watch this. >> reporter: what inspired you to write the president? >> well, i was so overwhelmed with sadden with the sandy hook shooting and i knew that as one person i couldn't do anything but i knew that president obama could. so i decided to write him a letter. >> reporter: what do you hope can happen? >> well, i hope it's much harder for people to buy guns. i hope that like people with mental illness can't buy a gun and -- yeah. >> reporter: tell me a little bit about what you said in the letter. >> well, basically i just said that i hoped that he would do something and i said that i have four brothers and sisters and i would be sad if one of them passed away and i also told him that i know that laws have
johnson, jr. is here to explain. >> gretchen: then this dog has only three legs, but don't let that fool you. he was just taught stealing sausages from the grocery store. it's video you got to see to believe. [ male announcer ] what!!?? a typical family pays $155,000 in "wall street" fees on their 401(k)s? go to e-trade. and roll over your old 401(k)s to a new e-trade retirement account. none of them charge annual fees, and all of them offer low cost investments. e-trade. less for us. more for you. ♪ [ male announcer ] let's take every drop of courage, every ounce of inspiration, every bit of determination, and go where we've never gone before. ♪ introducing the radically new avalon. toyota. let's go places. and save hundreds with our best offer. get an adt security system starting at just $49 installed, but for a limited time only. that's an instant savings of $250. don't leave your family's safety to chance when you can take advantage of these savings now. call or visit adt.com/tv. both: i had a break-in. man: by the time we called the police, there wasn't much they could do. i fel
controlled senate. you have senators on the democratic side like johnson in south dakota who are not very happy with the sort of president's my way or the highway approach to this legislation. what america needs is a practical president, into the legislative dictator and think senator blunt was spot on. i think there is tension in the democratic party as more goes on with the gun control debate we'll see the tension. >> heather: president had four proposals, universal checks for gun buyers and crackdown on gun buying and a.m. missions on magazines holding more than ten bullets. lindsay graham, republicans in the south carolina he said that he is confident there will be bipartisan opposition to his proposal. even harry reid stopped short of embracing president obama's proposal calling them thoughtful recommendations. is the president's tone contributing to a lack of bipartisanship? >> no. i don't think this is about his tone. i think it is interesting to have a republican senator calling president obama combative given the nature of in congress and how the senate has blocked and pushed the
of the same budget so you will find people up for reelection getting slaughtered in los angeles, tim johnson up for reelection going to lose that one, going to have a tough reelection. 22 democrats on the ballot in 2014 don't want to pass a budg budget. so they can sit back and say we will give you three months debt extension, but we will underscore the fact the president and harry reid will not lead in the country is going bankrupt. i hope they actually pass a budget but i doubt they will be able to do that now. ashley: all of these things sucking money away every day need to be reformed, don't you agree? tracy: i find it interesting talking bout medicaid, states have to balance their budgets. you're just pushing the buck saying we don't want to take care of this, some of them governors and they'll have to deal with it. they will not be happy if they have to block medicaid and choose whether to balance the budget or pay off medicaid. speaker that is simply not true. >> yes, it is. >> democratic states are broke. michigan is a balanced budget, to look at where the republicans are governing,
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 58 (some duplicates have been removed)

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